For a distinctly vertical climbing challenge, a trip up The Monument will reward your tenacity all the way up the 311 steps by providing not only great views, but even a certificate once you make it back down.

London has even more viewing vantage points then it does reasons for engaging in the physical exertion to reach them. For a distinctly vertical climbing challenge, a trip up The Monument will reward your tenacity all the way up the 311 steps by providing not only great views, but even a certificate once you make it back down. Standing at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill in the City of London, The Monument was completed in 1677 to commemorate the Great Fire of London of 1666 and in celebration of the rebuilding of the City. The flames raged on from the 2nd to the 5th of September and swallowed up vast swathes of the capital, including thousands of houses, streets, the City gates, churches and even the indomitable St. Paul’s Cathedral. The only buildings to survive in part were those built of stone - such as St. Paul’s and the Guildhall. The architect of these very same iconic buildings, Sir Christopher Wren, was then also Surveyor General to King Charles II; he was thus commissioned along with his friend and colleague Dr Robert Hooke to provide a design to mark the tragedy. They came up with the idea to build an enormous Doric column surmounted by a drum and a copper urn from which flames would emerge, symbolising the Great Fire. The Monument, as it came to be called, is 61 metres high (202 feet) – the exact distance between it and the site in Pudding Lane where the fire began in a baker’s shop. The Monument was initially tended to serve as a place for the Royal Society to conduct experiments, but the traffic was too intense and interfered with the results, leading to to be transformed into a place of historic interest affording visitors the chance to see right across London in all directions.